Necromunda hype!

I’ve not been able to talk much about the hype around the return of Necromunda on my blog yet, as I’ve been in the middle of moving house and stuff, so haven’t had a proper amount of time to digest the news we’ve seen from GW about it. However, I’ve been gorging myself on this stuff today, and I have to say, I’m incredibly excited to get my greasy paws on this box when it arrives in November!

I wasn’t around for the original Necromunda, which was out in 1995. I mean, I was alive, but I was much more interested in fantasy than 40k at the time. Anyway! This time around, it looks like GW have applied all of the style and panache of their recent sculpting success into the gangs we get in the box, to bring us (what looks like) twenty wonderfully individual miniatures that would look great on the tabletop. While I’m excited for the game, I’m excited for the miniatures and find myself hoping that we’ll be able to use them, in some way, in 40k at large, as well. At any rate, they should provide some amazing conversion-fodder!

I’ve already been thinking about the potential for House Escher as Wyches in my Dark Eldar army!

The sculpts look amazing, but I find myself less than enthused about the paint jobs on the minis we’ve seen so far. The purply skin tones seem to clash terribly with the yellow on the Escher minis, although I love the weapons options, and I’m really impressed by the look of them as a gang. House Goliath minis look somehow weirdly washed-out with the faintly rust-orange thing going on all over there, but even so, they look like solid sculpts that I’m finding myself looking forward to painting up just as much!

Each of these gangs will be multi-part plastic kits, and I’m so happy about this! It sounds like this game is going to be more like Betrayal at Calth rather than Deathwatch Overkill, and we’ll eventually get the sprues for each available separately without any need for them to re-tool the sculpts. I love getting individuality from models through the assembly, so this is definitely something to look forward to. Forge World are also set to do upgrade kits, which sounds like there could really be quite the industry coming out of this game! Not that there would really have been any doubt about its popularity, surely…?

While the game is coming with just two gangs, I really hope we get more options soon for more variety. News from the recent NOVA open indicates that we’re getting a lot of support for the game – Adeptus Arbites, welcome back!

The board seems a bit flat, especially when you consider that the original game was all about the multi-level experience. However, as the article from whence I’ve been plundering all of these pictures explains, there will also be rules for us to enjoy the game amid the Sector Mechanicus terrain sets, which makes me glad I picked up the entire range earlier this summer!

I’m hugely looking forward to getting hold of this game when it comes out. I’m hoping that GW don’t drop the ball and make it some kind of limited-run thing like the original Shadow War Armageddon box – hopefully, its release in November means that it is taking the place of the Horus Heresy boxed game that we’ve had over the last couple of years, and so will be available for a long time yet. Though of course, I imagine that initial take-up is going to be phenomenal.

I mean, it’s Necromunda!

Drukhari catch-up!

Hey everybody!
Well, it’s been quite the slog at times, but I’m pleased to announce that, this week, I’ve not only finished my initial Dark Eldar Oath project from back in February, but I’ve also started to add more miniatures to the ranks! Well, kinda…

Back in February, my local Games Workshop started a painting project where we all picked a new army for the new year (we were a little late getting it all sorted), and we had six months to paint up a 1000-point list. Of course, 7th Edition was still a thing, and I’d already started to build and paint Dark Eldar, so I went along with making up a list there. You can read all about my initial efforts with the dark kin here.

Over the course of the last few months, then, I’ve been trying to get paint on this thousand-point list, though was initially pretty stumped by the vehicles. I mean, I’m fine with painting infantry, and even the odd monster, but vehicles seem to just get me every time. I had the same issue with the Necron stuff, and the only thing I’ve managed to complete for the Space Marine stuff is that Alpha Legion Rhino, which isn’t my finest work! So having a pretty mechanised army was a bit of a stumbling block, I have to say!

However, I think I’ve managed to pull it all back quite well, and this weekend got the list finished! It wasn’t my original 1000-point list, as 8th Edition had kinda messed with that to the point where I wouldn’t be able to fit everything in. One Raider was cut out, and the Trueborn had to be re-done with their weapons options, but I’m finally at the point where the army is done!

I’m actually really happy with it, in the end. Sure, the faces are always going to cause me grief – but this is tabletop standard, I’m not trying to win any awards with them! I just want a fully-painted force, done to the best of my ability.

Costed precisely how each model is built, I’ve worked this out to be 1010 points, or 53 power, in the new edition. But that includes stuff like the power sword on the Dracon, which I’m not sure I actually want to use in the game. The first game, incidentally, is lined up for tomorrow, so I’ll be sure to come back with some thoughts on how they play in the not-too-distant future!

I’ve also been finishing off a few other models for the Dark Eldar, which had been built for the original list. Initially, both Kabalite Warrior squads were in Raiders, but the increased points on vehicles has meant that I can only take one now. That said, a Raider is the same points cost as my current Kabalite Trueborn build, so I could always swap them out.

I still have a Ravager and a Venom that have been partially finished for a while now, so I hope to get those models completed soon enough! In the meantime, though, I’ve been working on a third squad of Warriors, and also getting round to painting the Reaver Jetbikes! Exciting times ahead, I must say!!

The Outcast Dead

I've been missing the heresy, so it's time to get back! #HorusHeresy

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I’m slowly making progress with the Horus Heresy series once again, having recently finished reading book 17 in the juggernaut of grimdark novel series, The Outcast Dead. It’s probably important to note that I’ve skipped Prospero Burns for the time being, as I’m not interested in Space Wolves (even if it is Dan Abnett at the pen), and have saved the short story compendium Age of Darkness for another time.

Anyhow!

The Outcast Dead is a very weird book, one that alternately fascinated me and annoyed the hell out of me. First of all to note, this is the first time a Horus Heresy novel takes place entirely on Terra. We follow the broken astropath Kai Zulane as he returns to the City of Sight for reconditioning, following a catastrophe aboard the Argo, a ship in the employ of the Navigator House Castana. Kai and the ship’s Navigator, Roxanne Castana, are the only two survivors of the tragedy, which saw a warp storm rip the ship apart, demons spilling into the ship and killing the entire crew. Roxanne herself has taken refuge from her House, who wanted to make her a scapegoat for the loss of the ship, at the Temple of Woe, a strange place near the Imperial Palace where people basically bring their dead for incineration.

The bulk of the first part of the novel deals with Kai Zulane and Roxanne alternately, and we get some insight into the working of the Adeptus Astra Telepathica at this time. However, when Magnus makes his ill-fated psychic attempt to warn the Emperor of Horus’ betrayal, the psychic shockwave is felt across Terra, and millions are destroyed by the warp spawn that manage to break into reality. During this incursion, Kai Zulane is given forbidden knowledge about the future that is deposited within his centre of guilt over what happened to the Argo, and he is incapable of accessing that knowledge until he has faced what happened.

He is taken to the Custodian Guard, who attempt to break the information out of him, but at this time a group of powerful Space Marines imprisoned within the Custodians’ dungeons make their escape attempt. Led by Atharva of the Thousand Sons, and including three World Eaters, a Luna Wolf, a Death Guard and an Emperor’s Children, the “Outcast Dead” break out, picking up Kai in the process, but their stolen flyer is shot down in the Petitioners’ City, a vast slum close to the Palace. The Marines are tracked along their way, and come up against the local ganglord Babu Dhakal, who turns out to be a Thunder Warrior that has inexplicably survived the Wars of Unification, and attempts to capture the Marines in an effort to use their geneseed to help prolong his life.

In a battle with the Babu’s enforcer Ghota, two of the Marines are killed, and so the remaining Outcast Dead take their bodies for disposal in the Temple of Woe. There, the Custodians catch up with them, and after a bloody battle, all of the Marines are killed, with the exception of Saverian the Luna Wolf. Kai, reunited with Roxanne, begs the Navigator to use her third eye’s power to kill him, to stop any further abuses of his body and mind in the effort to extract the knowledge of the future.

The book is weird, mainly because it takes place in the weird realm of the psychic. The astropaths and other folk at the City of Sight are all slightly odd, and a clear sense of other-ness really pervades the book. While we do get Space Marines in the form of the Outcast Dead, it’s really interesting to see another side of the Imperium, much like with Graham McNeill’s previous novel Mechanicum, which maintained itself largely without any recourse to the Astartes.

In addition, we get a bit of a look at the Navigators, though without as much depth as the astropaths. It was a little confusing at times, as Kai was said to be in the employ of House Castana and to be working for the Ultramarines, and I couldn’t quite work out what was going on there. Of course, the details are largely irrelevant. I don’t think the Navigators have been shown previously in the series, however, so it was nice to have them show up for a bit.

Indeed, we seem to get many fringe elements turn up in this book, as the Sisters of Silence make a brief but pivotal appearance at the final battle, as well as a couple of Custodians having some decent page-time. Finally, we get the elements of the mythical past in the form of two Thunder Warriors, who are all presumed dead following the Wars of Unity. I can’t quite decide if I liked this inclusion, or if it felt a bit like over-kill. Of course, while the fact that there were survivors shouldn’t be surprising given the breadth of the universe we’re dealing with here, I think I would have preferred them to be left out, and Babu Dhakal to have been a Space Marine washout or something.

For all that I found it fascinating, however, I was also really quite disappointed with the book. The story of the Heresy has barely advanced since the first couple of books in the series – with Nemesis providing the first proper step on the timeline since probably Battle for the Abyss. Instead of continuing the story, we’ve instead gone back a step to the psychic incursion of Magnus to warn the Emperor, which we saw in A Thousand Sons, six books prior. It’s not entirely all bad, don’t get me wrong, but I just feel like we’re not really getting anywhere right now. I get that the narrative is immense and epic and all the rest of it, but I’m used to novel series from the Star Wars universe that tell a complete storyline – even padded out quite considerably – within nineteen books…!

I’m still more interested in what’s happened to Garviel Loken at the end of Galaxy in Flames!

It was an enjoyable book for a lot of reasons, although the copy I have is absolutely riddled with typos, word omissions and, towards the end, printing errors. It is a little frustrating that we’re seventeen books into the series and we don’t seem to have advanced very far at all into the story of the Heresy, but I suppose that’s just how the series is being told.

Another new army!

Hey everybody!
By now, you no doubt realise that I have an addiction to Games Workshop and their little plastic men. Well, we all have our vices. Anyway, while I’ve been both adding to my Necrons, and building up my Dark Eldar, I’ve also been thinking about a lot of the smaller-scale stuff that I have had on the go for varying lengths of time. Genestealer Cults, Deathwatch, and even the regular Space Marine stuff – but first and foremost, I’ve been thinking about making some sort of expansive Imperium army. With the release of the Imperial Agents codex last Christmas, I’ve been pondering all sorts of different combinations of interesting little marginal character-armies, and with the roll-out of 8th Edition, this idea is getting a little more firmly off the ground!

Adeptus Mechanicus Skitarii

Back in May, I’d picked up a Start Collecting Skitarii box set, and not long after had built up five Skitarii Rangers. They’d been hanging about primed for a number of weeks, but finally I’ve decided to actually get myself in gear and paint the little blighters! I’d initially wanted to paint them in the Metalica scheme, but decided that I didn’t want the hassle of painting the off-white robes. In the event, I’ve created my own Forge World, which is yet to receive a name, but still! I’d initially wanted to have some very blue Skitarii, to contrast with the usual reds, but as it turns out, these chaps are just kinda muted and grungy. I’d hoped the bases would brighten the scheme somewhat and set them off nicely, but as it happens, they just seem to have added to the overall muted effect! Hm.

The robes have been done with Stegadon Scale Green, with Dark Reaper and Thunderhawk Blue providing the highlights; inside it’s a case of Celestra Grey and Ulthuan Grey, all of the robes then shaded with Drakenhof Nightshade. The pressure suit was done with Eshin Grey shaded with Nuln Oil, and the metallics are the usual scheme of Leadbelcher and Nuln Oil, and Balthasar Gold and Agrax Earthshade. I’d decided against painting the Machina Opus in the usual half-and-half manner, and instead have opted for a golden skull. Might see if I can somehow tie that in to the history of my Forge World at some point. The guns are painted with Rhinox Hide, shaded with Agrax Earthshade, and then highlighted with Skrag Brown. The Arc weaponry is Caledor Sky highlighted with Baharroth Blue. Both of these are pretty much the Duncan-approved methods, anyway! The purity seals are Zandri Dust (parchment) and Tuskgor Fur (wax) shaded with Agrax Earthshade. Finally, the eye lenses have been done with Ulthuan Grey shaded with Carroburg Crimson.

Despite the fact that they haven’t turned out as I’d first imagined them, I nevertheless actually really like these guys! I think once I have a proper horde of them on the tabletop, with some vehicles in amongst them, it’ll look really cool, anyway!

So what am I going to be doing with this army?

As I said before, it’s an Imperium Army, and for the most part I’ll be using models that I’ve already got hanging about for one reason or another. It’s broken up into two Patrol detachments, and combined comes to 50 power / 1000 points exactly. Let’s break it down.

Imperium Army

I’ve got a lot of Militarum Tempestus stormtroopers anyway, so thought it would be good to get some use out of them. Two squads of five Scions, flying about the field in a Chimera with a Commissar for inspiration should be useful – by giving every squad a vox caster, I should be able to make maximum use of the Tempestor Prime and his command rod, relaying orders up to 18″ away from him. I mean, in my head it sounds cool, but I don’t know exactly whether it will play out that way!

I bought a bunch of Astra Militarum stuff around Christmastime for my burgeoning Genestealer Cults army, so already have a Chimera and Commissar that are just waiting to be built – I had initially thought about converting the Commissar to be a Genestealer Hybrid, as I wanted my entire Guard to be cultists, but I think that may be a bit too much to bother with. Plus, the Primus is a pretty good Commissar stand-in if I need one! I’ve already built up two squads from a pair of Scions kits, as I was building up the relevant Scions for the expansion to Deathwatch Overkill that appeared in White Dwarf back in the day. Working through each of those models has proven to require a third box, however, to make legal squads, but no matter. I enjoy having the variety of weapons and such, anyway, and they are really quite wonderful kits to put together, after all.

For the Skitarii portion of the army, I only needed to get a second squad of the Rangers/Vanguard kit, and a Sydonian Dragoon. I’d already been attempting to paint some Electro-Priests over a year ago now, so hopefully this will prompt me to finish them off, and the Start Collecting box really is incredible value. I do plan on getting another in time, in part to continue the idea of a wave of Skitarii marching implacably across the table, but those Onager Dunecrawlers have been growing on me as models, and while I’d initially planned on selling that portion of the box, I think I’d like to have at least a pair of the buggers on the table!

The Skitarii portion of the list feels much smaller, but is actually a fairly significant portion of the overall army. While I was surprised at first at how cheap some of the units actually are, I think it would also be quite easy to sink a lot of points into upgrades that, on T3 models, are probably wasted. If building Dark Eldar has taught me anything, it’s to be sparing with the upgrades!!

Before I end this blog, I just want to give a shout-out to Alchemists Workshops in Winsford, who I came across after watching The War Gamer‘s painting tutorials on youtube. I trundled over there earlier in the week to pick up the above bits, and couldn’t believe how well-stocked and how cheap the Games Workshop stuff is! It’s in the middle of an industrial estate, which feels a little weird to me, but I was very impressed! Definitely going to be making that journey again to stock up on stuff soon, anyway!

New Primaris Marines inbound!

New Primaris Marines are coming!

This captain does look pretty good, even if he will most likely be the usual style of mono-pose hero guys. Options for different weapons and heads does sound appealing though, so I’m excited to get one!

The librarian is a really cool looking mini, I have to say. I’ve been recently thinking about finally putting some paint on the librarian I built last year, so it seems the perfect time with this chap on the way!

These two chaps are coming next week, followed later in July by something called “getting started” kits, which feature new units for both the Primaris Marines and the Death Guard:

These chaps are apparently in coloured plastic and are “easy to build” snap-fit, which I’m quite dubious about to be perfectly honest. I’ve been building up more of the Primaris Marines from the Dark Imperium box lately, but had been looking forward to getting the multi-part plastic kits that usually follow. However – this? Hm. I hope that we’ll be getting the multi-part stuff as well as this easy-build stuff, though something tells me that may not be the case…

Though I have to say, easy-build pox walkers will no doubt be just as fine whether multi-part or not – I mean, the old snap-fit Chaos Cultists you can pick up are fine!

All of these things are coming in a new starter set (new, already?!) –

First Strike brings all these easy-build releases together with some introductory scenarios to teach the game as you play – with a poster-mat and cardboard scenery to boot!

There’s also Know No Fear, which seems to be a pared-down version of the Dark Imperium box (again, already?!) –

All of this stuff is obviously going to be fantastic for people new to the hobby, and should be awesome to get folks into the process of building and playing – though of course, I find it a bit strange that the focus seems split between the two. I mean, if you’ve never put a mini together before, then easy-build Marines are great. But you still need to buy the tools to clip them off the sprues and prepare them for painting – and then there’s the paints and brushes! Seems a little too… diverse…

Anyway!

There is only war!

Hey everybody!
Well, after the exciting launch of the new edition of Warhammer 40,000 at the weekend, there really could only be one game that would be featured on my game day blog today! This isn’t going to be any kind of exhaustive account of the game, but more some of my initial thoughts after getting the new starter set and having had a flick through the rules. So let’s take a look inside the Dark Imperium!

Warhammer 40,000 Dark Imperium

Warhammer 40,000 8th Edition is amazing. While I haven’t yet had a chance to field any of my armies in the new rules, I can still say that this is the most excited that I have ever been for this game in the last three years, and I’ve been fiddling with army lists and devouring rules, building and painting more miniatures, and generally basking in the glow of the new for a while now. 7th Edition confused and scared me, and given the fact that this is supposed to be a game that you’re supposed to play for fun, that’s just weird. By contrast, 8th Edition seems much more straightforward, while retaining a degree of depth.

I had a total of three games played during 7th, so I’m not about to launch into a comparison of the two editions, but I may still make the odd comment. To begin, though, I think it’ll help to go over the phases of the game and see how the whole thing is structured.

So, once you’ve chosen armies and missions, and have gone through the various stages of setting up your miniatures on the table, the game begins with the Movement phase. Models all have a Movement characteristic, which is now representative of the individual models rather than a stock number for a particular unit type, no matter that unit’s biology. I do like this, as it makes things much easier because everything is right there on the datasheet for that unit, rather than having to remember stuff all the time. (I’ve ranted about this before, though!)

Next comes the Psychic Phase. Something that I usually don’t bother with, having my main army as Necrons and my second army as Dark Eldar, the Psychic Phase is nevertheless something that I really like the look of, and has been one of the reasons I’m so keen to get moving on my Genestealer Cults army! Things have been simplified, so that you now attempt to manifest a psychic power by rolling 2D6, and Deny the Witch just means roll 2D6 and beat the test result. Seems very straightforward, rather than gaining all those warp charge dice, and using some to do things with and all the rest of it.

The Shooting Phase has changed insofar as units can split fire, and the roll to hit is now a target in the unit’s profile, for example 3+ for the Genestealer Primus, rather than having a Ballistics Skill value that is subtracted from 7 in order to find out what you need to roll. BS, indeed. There is still the nonsense about rolling again to see if you wound the target, comparing the strength value of the weapon to the toughness value of the model you’re shooting. It seems unnecessary to have to roll twice to see if a shot was fired at a unit, but at least there’s no longer the need to memorise a massive table of what you need to roll to actually wound somebody – now, there’s a very simple chart that does simplify this element a great deal. My main issue though is that this element is still in the game, to begin with! In real life, if I shoot you in the head, the odds are it will cause a wound, you know? Anyway… There are still Saves to be made, either armour saves or cover saves, and this involves another change, as weapons have modifiers to these saves on them now. I like this, as it makes a lot more sense to me. For example, going back to our Primus example, he has a Save of 5+. However, if you’re shooting at him with a Necron Immortal wielding a gauss blaster, those weapons have -2 Armour Penetration, meaning that the saving throw is made worse by 2. So that Primus needs to roll a 7 or more to avoid that wound, on a single D6. I don’t know if you’d ever use Immortals for that sort of attack, but the Primus does have five wounds, and could be the Genestealer Cults’ warlord, so it could be useful!

After shooting comes the Charge Phase, where you can charge an enemy unit within 12″ by rolling 2D6 and moving, before which the enemy has the chance to fire Overwatch at you. This is an out-of-sequence shooting attack, where all shots hit on 6+ regardless of the previous Ballistics Skill business, to reflect the panic I suppose. Whereas previously this could be detrimental to your charge, as you had to remove casualties from the front, meaning you might not have enough models to get within melee distance, now the controlling player chooses where his casualties come from, so you can remove models from the back if you want.

The Fight Phase has changed insofar as the charging unit will go first, now that Initiative has gone. I’ve talked about this before as well, how I liked Initiative and stuff, so I’m a bit gutted about that. Apart from that, though, it does still feel mechanically like 7th Edition. You charge, you pile in, then you slug it out with hand-to-hand weapons. This is pretty much the same as shooting before, though you use the Weapons Skill value to determine hits. I’m looking forward to seeing how my Necron Lychguard fare this time around, as the warscythes do look to be quite beastly in close combat – hitting on 3+, then wounding most often on 3+ also with a -4 AP and 2 wounds per hit, that looks awesome! As an example, a unit of five Lychguard would make ten attack rolls that hit a Genestealer Cults Chimera on 3+, they’d wound on 4+ because the strength and toughness are both 7, but due to the AP, the Chimera’s save would be 7+. It’s too early in the day to work out probability, but I’m sure it would be glorious!

Interestingly, you don’t get the additional dice for charging – I guess getting to go first in combat is bonus enough!

Finally, the Morale Phase checks to see how many models from a unit died that turn, and adds that number to a D6 roll. If the result is higher than the Leadership value of the unit, you remove models from that unit equal to the number of points higher you rolled. So if you roll a 5 and 4 models were slain from a unit of Neophyte Hybrids, their Leadership is 7 so you remove two more models from that unit.


These are the core rules of the game now, so a lot of it has indeed been simplified. However, there is a strong element of Age of Sigmar in this game insofar as each datasheet for each unit contains unit-specific rules. While the core rules are therefore just 8 pages long, there are tons more rules in the place of the universal special rules that took up a chunk of the core rulebook previously. Sure, things like the unit types rules have been drastically simplified, and these changes are definitely for the better, as it makes it so much more straightforward to seeing just how a unit works. I’ve rambled about my difficulties in trying to find the rules for Triarch Praetorians previously, needing two different books and about four separate pages within those books just to figure out how the models work. None of that exists now, really. If you know the 8 pages of rules, all you need in front of you is your own datasheet for that unit, and away you go.

(Of course, there are army-wide rules that still exist, such as the Reanimation Protocols rule for Necrons, which aren’t detailed on each and every datasheet. So you may still have a little flicking around to start with.)

I love the fact that the datasheets have everything you need to know, even down to the most common weapon loadout profiles. True, I’d have preferred to have seen every weapon on there for even greater ease, but I imagine some units might get quickly over-loaded. But these things are few and far between. In the main, if you want to know what a weapon on your model does, the rules are there on the same page as that model.

The three ways to play thing, ported pretty much directly from Age of Sigmar, is also really cool as it allows the game to be more things to more people. If you like picking out an awesome element from the narrative and re-creating that, you can do that. If you want to have an equal points-level, you can do that as well. Points have been taken one step further, by having an overall “power” level for a unit, based on roughly 25-3o power for every 500 points. While initially it seemed that power levels were being decried as worthless, over the launch weekend it seems that pretty much everyone at my local stores were talking in terms of power rather than points. It seems to be a great way to quickly build a list and start playing, rather than spending an evening working out the exact cost of your army. Of course, if that’s your thing, then you can still do that.

What’s even more interesting to me is the fact that there are 8 pages of core rules, the majority of this blog so far having gone over them, but there’s an additional Appendix that adds in a bunch more rules that you can add in to however you choose to play, meaning you really can make 8th Edition as complicated as you like.

I think the rules overall are a great way to invest a lot of narrative into the game, and I’m really looking forward to getting some games in soon!


As always with a new edition, we also get a new Starter Set for the game, which has previously come with all of the dice and templates that you need, in addition to a rulebook and lots of fantastic miniatures. Well, this edition doesn’t use templates or special dice, but we do get the full hardback rulebook, along with some truly spectacular miniatures in the new Dark Imperium box!

Warhammer 40,000 Dark Imperium

The factions included here are the Primaris Space Marines, and the Death Guard. So it’s a bit similar to the last box, Dark Vengeance, which featured loyalist vs Chaos space marines, but the miniatures here are really quite spectacular. I think the painting video where Duncan paints the Lord of Contagion really shows how incredible these new guys are!

Of course, people are a bit twitchy about the new Primaris marines spelling the end of the current Space Marine line, but I’ve got to be honest, I think these guys look amazing. I’d been back and forth over whether I liked them, before finally settling on a yes a day or two before the release. Having now had the opportunity to actually build and paint some, I think this is what Space Marines should have always been. The Mk VII armoured chaps will always hold a special place for me, and I plan to continue building and painting them for my Novamarines, but I think the Primaris are certainly a worthy addition to the universe, and I can’t wait to see what we get in the multipart kits that will inevitably follow later in the summer…

You get the full hardback core rules, which alone cost £35 and accounts for most of the weight of this thing, as well as short “codexes” for each of the factions that have some paint schemes, some fluff, and the datasheets (they even include the points values for them, if that’s something that interests you!) And of course, you get 53 beautiful (if disgusting, in the case of the Nurgle stuff) miniatures. £95 seems like a lot of money, don’t get me wrong, but it also feels about right for what you get. Burning of Prospero came with 47 miniatures, and a separate game, for the same price. So it does seem to be fairly standard – and of course, if you manage to get it for less, then go for it!


With three ways to play the game, straightforward rules for the game, and an increasingly phenomenal miniatures catalogue with which to populate the game, Warhammer 40k has never seemed more exciting! Locally, 8th Edition seems to have garnered a lot of interest among the “never playing 40k” crowd, and while I’ve long been interested in the game, I’ve never been more keen to finally get some regular games in!

Warhammer 40k 8th Edition – one week to go!

There’s only one week left before we get the new edition of Warhammer 40k, and I’m getting so very excited it’s untrue! I’ve been looking forward to the new edition since I knew for sure it was going to be A Thing, and now I think I’m getting into overdrive!

Part of the reason for this is, I think, due to watching the short series of videos put out on Warhammer TV’s youtube channel, specifically this one:

It feels like not only is the game being given a nice, clean facelift, but also we’re getting a lot of story advancement, which is leaving me with the overwhelming sense of the newness of the setting.

While there have been plenty of dissenting voices about some of the new lore, mainly since some of the articles being put up on the Warhammer Community site, but I think splitting the galaxy in two could lead to some wonderful storytelling opportunities. I’ve heard some people compare it to the split of the Roman empire but, personally, I think it feels more akin to the Iron Curtain in postwar Europe, with the Imperium under Guilliman analogous to the west, and the Imperium Nihilus akin to the east. It would be really cool if this is the direction they take it, of course, but who knows what will happen?!

The fact that Phil Kelly says they’re going to expand further on this has also gotten me excited, and I’m left thinking that perhaps we’re in for more Gathering Storm-style events, perhaps with triumvirate boxes to accompany them. I think it’s a fairly safe bet that we’re getting Mortarion within a matter of weeks, so maybe he’ll be coming with some pox-friends?

Ultramar

The 40k universe has always been so rich and vibrant, and flicking through my Deathwatch RPG books this morning has really reminded me of that quite strongly. The idea of being able to explore this in a more focused and story-driven manner is incredibly exciting, and while the Horus Heresy series has been a bit of a lumbering juggernaut at times, at its best the series is just truly phenomenal! If they can capture the best of that and bring it into the 41st millennium, then I think I’ll be an over-excited chap for a long time to come!

Necrons

So, if you have a local gaming store near you, or you’ve been paying attention to the internet lately, you’ve no doubt now had a chance to take a look at these new Indexes and so forth. Last week I talked about the changes between a 1000-point list made in 7th edition and its 8th edition updates, but today I thought I’d share with you a basic 1000-point Newhammer Necron list that I’ve put together. My local store is holding a casual 1000-point tournament on launch day, which I’m not sure about getting to yet, but hope to be able to go along and try out the new edition. I think this is a very “safe” list, not using too many fancy units or any potentially confusing things, so I have no idea how competitive it could be. A lot of people have been bemoaning the fact that Necrons seem to have been nerfed by the new edition, but I think that’s predominantly since the loss of the decurion detachment, which I never ran anyway, so I don’t foresee any tears or tantrums here!

Necron list

It’s a simple thing, as I said, but I think I want to start off simple and build up my game from there! I’ve currently got the Immortals and Lychguard at minimum squad size, but due to the change in Reanimation Protocols (rolling to restore a model to the unit rather than rolling as an additional save), it might be worth bunching them up into bigger squads. I’m actually surprised at how close the points are for Immortals here to their 7th edition versions, which suggests to me that they were pretty balanced before! I’ve built up most of my Immortals with gauss blasters, and I think I only have one unit with tesla carbines, so I need to get a second built shortly. Tesla seems to be the thing for Necrons in 8th, with rolls of 6 causing three hits rather than one. I still like the gauss for AP-2, and the way I roll dice, I don’t think I’ll ever get maximum use out of the tesla. But it is still causing me to want to get that Annihilation Barge finished off!!

I’ve been trying to re-do some of my original Necrons since January, also. They were among the first miniatures I’d ever painted and, while playing a game last November, I felt they were really showing their age. It’s something I’ve talked about before, of course! In January, I stripped ten Lychguard and have been slowly getting paint back on them – hopefully I’ll have a Necrons update blog soon, where I can show off some of the things I’ve been painting here!