The Worldwound Gambit

Hey everybody!
As you may recall, I’ve been on something of a Pathfinder kick recently, re-starting the Rise of the Runelords Adventure Card Game scenario, and if you follow me on instagram (and let’s be fair, why wouldn’t you? Food and miniatures, and the occasional book or comic – it’s got it all!) you’ll have seen this bad boy crop up about two weeks ago:

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Now, for something different… #Pathfinder

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Well, I’ve finally finished it! Yes, two whole weeks it took me, though I was obviously doing other stuff for that time as well…

This book was actually really good. It was a little ploddy at times, but in the main I really liked it. It follows a group of thieves and rogues as they attempt to stop the demonic incursions into Golarion by marching right into the Worldwound itself and destroying the Tower of Yath there, which has been acting as something of a locus of power for the demons. Each of the six brigands is a fairly interesting character, and the folks they meet along the way also make for an enjoyable read.

So why did it take me two weeks to read?

The book is told in the present tense, which I’m not all that much a fan of, and while the characters are fairly interesting, as I said, they’re not stand-out amazing to the extent that I was all that interested in the story. We have a halfling lock-picker, a fire mage, a drug-addict bard, a pacifist half-orc, a noblewoman blade fighter, all of whom are led by a sort of dashing rogue thief. They all seem to have a shared history that is only really ever implied, and their motivation for going into the Worldwound and destroying the Tower of Yath is a bit precarious at times, and I found myself not altogether convinced by it – basically, demon invasions are bad for business, so they risk death and destruction to ensure they can still go about their con-artist ways.

The book starts fairly dramatically, with a full-on demon invasion of the town of Mendev, and then sees the main protagonist, Gad, assemble his crew to take down the demons. It was during these opening half-dozen or so chapters that the realisation finally dawned upon me: this is basically a role-playing game adventure told in novel form. As soon as I realised this, the novel became so much more enjoyable to read, and made so much more sense to me. The way the characters would move from place to place and encounter obstacles in their quest, which usually gave one character a major role and several others a minor part to play – the whole thing was really nicely done, and the present-tense storytelling makes so much more sense, as this is what you would do if you were a GM.

Some of the reviews I’ve seen for this book have mentioned its haphazard nature, and the cipher-like characters with little backstory explained. If you approach this as a RPG story where you don’t have to roll dice but can just sit back and see what happens, then the book is definitely worthwhile reading.

So, where am I up to with my Rise of the Runelords campaign?

Pathfinder adventure card game

Well, Darago the Necromancer and Sajan the Drunken Master finally started on the path through Burnt Offerings, and it started out really well! I’m playing this adventure path solo, which isn’t all that complicated if I’m honest, as the only real thing to remember is to turn over the top of the Blessings deck after each character takes a turn. Suddenly, I’m seeing those cards that allow you to discard to explore your location in a whole new light!

During the first game, Attack on Sandpoint, the villain, Ripnugget and Stickfoot, kept turning up within the top two or three cards of the locations, so it was over rather quickly! I have to say though, the main villain of this scenario is a goblin riding a lizard – how awesome is that?!

Next up, we have Local Heroes, which I remember playing back when the game was still fairly new, and from memory I thought it was a kind of respite-quest, where you basically get to skulk around and see if you can get more stuff. Well, not so this time around! Darago actually died to a Skinsaw Cultist! Good grief!

Pathfinder adventure card game

I was actually, genuinely bummed when this happened, having been really excited to get going with the character back when I started my quest. This all happened at the end of May, and I haven’t yet gotten round to starting the new character, Seelah the Paladin. My love of Lord of the Rings recently resurfaced, of course, so I’ve been thinking more about that game, though I have still picked up the Inquisitor class deck – for the inevitable death of either my Monk or Paladin characters! I do think I was perhaps a bit too reckless with Darago, discarding in the hope to get better cards, and not realising that I could in fact be decked by enemy damage. Gah!

I’m not sure if I’ve mentioned it already, but the next box in the Adventure Card Game line is the Mummy’s Mask path, which I am super excited for as I love anything that gives ancient Egypt a fantasy trope (Tomb Kings, I’m looking at you!)

On the Threshold of Discovery! The ancient lands of Osirion are blanketed by the sands of time, and eldritch secrets and vast riches lie just beneath the sun-blistered surface. As modern Osirion opens its tombs to outsiders for the first time in centuries, many of these lost treasures and secrets are now emerging—some more malign than others. Can your group of heroes brave terrible guardians, foul cults, and the burning sands of the desert to stop the rebirth of an ancient tyrant?

This complete cooperative strategy game pits 1 to 4 heroes against the monsters, curses, and traps of the Mummy’s Mask Adventure Path. Choose your character’s class, build a deck of equipment, magic, and allies; and explore dangerous locations as you journey through an exciting fantasy tale. As your adventures continue, your characters add unique gear and awesome magic to their decks as they gain incredible powers, all of which they’ll need to challenge more and more powerful threats.

So that is really exciting! Stay tuned for more Pathfinder goodness, anyway, as I hope to make it through to the end of Burnt Offerings soon!

Star Wars: Clone Wars season two

Hey everybody,
I’ve been making my way through the second season of Clone Wars tv series lately, so thought I’d come along here and follow up my look at the first season. There are a couple of interesting moments in this season, though overall I was surprised to find it was a bit of a let down, if I’m honest! Let’s take a look…

Star Wars Clone Wars

Like the first season, there are several episodes that form arcs throughout the season, which I kinda like as a series of twenty-two episodes, of twenty minutes each, always has the risk of being stand-alone and kinda pointless. There are very few single episodes in the second season, in fact, as all of them have links of varying strengths with each other.

I think the most important of these arcs is that dealing with the Mandalorians, because it caused such a massive stir in the community at the time it was released. Up to this point (late 2009), author Karen Traviss had been behind several highly successful novels, including the Republic Commando series, and a few tie-ins to the new Clone Wars itself. Traviss had made a name for herself as the Mandalorian Queen, writing her clones as having a strong cultural tie to the Mandalorian, Jango Fett. Of course, Mandalorians had been popular within Star Wars fandom for years since Boba Fett’s costume made him so many fans, and they had grown into a race of superhuman mercenary awesome guys who we were pretty much browbeaten into loving instantly.

Star Wars Clone Wars Duchess of Mandalore

Then we got episode 12 of Clone Wars season two, The Mandalore Plot. Turns out, the Mandalorians are a peaceful people, who have confined the war-like vestiges of their culture to the moon of Concordia (Concord Dawn, anyone?) and live in harmony much like the Naboo and Alderaanians we’ve come to know from the EU. The Duchess of Mandalore herself leads the pacifist Council of Neutral Systems, in fact. The arc features Obi-Wan investigating claims the Mandalorians are arming against the Republic, and we soon learn he and Duchess Satine have some prior history together. The two discover that a breakaway faction of Mandalorians have re-formed the Death Watch and plan to overthrow the pacifist government, with the help of Count Dooku.

This arc is actually pretty great, if I’m honest. The Mandalorian controversy aside, I feel that it reaches deep into the Star Wars lore and provides a real treat for a lot of fans. Sure, there are many moments that I wish hadn’t happened – though at least Jar Jar wasn’t in any of them. I really enjoyed seeing the deepening of Obi-Wan’s character, and think the idea that he is actually a lot more worldly than many other Jedi provides an interesting tension with Anakin. There is a lot here that makes Obi-Wan a really interesting Jedi, one that certainly learnt a lot from Qui-Gon Jinn.

Star Wars Clone Wars Geonosian Queen

There’s a pretty extensive arc set on Geonosis that, if I’m honest, just annoys me immensely. We get to meet the Geonosian Queen, and while that makes total sense, as the Geonosians are essentially bugs, the whole zombie/mind-control thing with the worms was just ridiculous, and seemed a completely contrived way to engender the danger for Ahsoka and Barriss. Oh yeah, Luminara’s back, and this time she’s brought her padawan with her. The two are terribly mishandled, in my opinion, and serve merely to show how much better Anakin and Ahsoka are. I find this a bit annoying, as Luminara and Barriss were officially introduced in the novel The Approaching Storm, specifically as a counterpoint to the master-and-apprentice relationship that Obi-Wan and Anakin have in Attack of the Clones. Barriss is probably a padawan for the longest time among all of the Jedi, and their roles here are the worst part of this for me, I have to say.

And that includes having Anakin and Ahsoka throw Rex off a massive wall and then Force-leap to the ground after him. Harumph.

Star Wars Clone Wars Holocron Heist

The arc that opens the season follows Cad Bane on a job for Darth Sidious, stealing a Jedi holocron that holds the names of all of the Force-sensitive children in the galaxy. Putting aside the issue of just why the Jedi have this information, but are seemingly doing nothing with it, the arc is something of a let-down, as we once again get to follow Ahsoka making a hash of things yet being thought of as some kind of kickass character, and Anakin being an incredibly bad example with next to no repercussions. It was good to see Bane again, though I do feel that he is the sort of character that would benefit from less exposure. His role here is okay, though, and we do get some absolutely wonderful film noir-like shots of him in his rented room, so I can’t complain too loudly!

Star Wars Clone Wars Boba Fett

Bounty hunters suffuse the final arc of the season, as well, as we have what should be an absolutely awesome finale to the season. I think we all knew something was going to be up with Boba Fett going after Mace Windu after that scene in Attack of the Clones when he picks up his fallen father’s helmet, and while we did get a young adult series of books that dealt with this (I should do a blog on those, they had some good moments), none of that is canon anymore. Clone Wars has essentially re-done the storyline, and I have to say, I’m surprised nobody had thought of doing this previously with the character.

Boba Fett is a clone, so he infiltrates a Jedi cruiser (I still find it hilarious that they’re legitimately called that) as a clone cadet! It’s kinda genius, I thought! Of course, he glowers and grimaces a lot, and it really is obvious that he’s not one of them, though I suppose the writers need to telegraph these points to the target audience. It’s a really terrific conceit, and they even got Daniel Logan back to play him (and the other cadets). It turns out that Boba is being helped in his vendetta by Aurra Sing, who is just as crazy as the EU had us believe all these years. We even get to hook up with Hondo Ohnaka once again!

However, the arc is just a bit too, well, obvious in the way it goes. Clearly Boba isn’t going to get to kill Mace, because Palpatine does that in Revenge of the Sith, but there was a certain stilted feel to the three-part arc, that really disappointed me, as it should have been tremendous, by rights.

At any rate, I think I should probably draw this to a close now, because I could ramble on all day. This is by no means a complete look at all of the episodes – the Zillo Beast is rightly left out, I feel, and while it’s cool to see folks like Mon Mothma show up, Senate Murders was something of a low point for me. But I wanted to give at least a rough overview of the season, and I suppose my top three episodes overall!

This was actually more difficult than for season one, as I don’t really like any of the episodes from this season – those on this list are therefore the best of a bad bunch, ones that I can just about tolerate. Death Trap is top merely because of the awesome idea of having Boba Fett infiltrate the clone cadets; Holocron Heist has some wonderful visuals of Cad Bane, and Duchess of Mandalore has some great cat-and-mouse intrigue on Coruscant. I wouldn’t really say I love these episodes, but they’re the best I can come up with, if I’m honest!

1. Death Trap
2. Holocron Heist
3. Duchess of Mandalore

How about you guys? Shocked at how harsh I was on the Zillo Beast?! Can’t stand the Mandalorian controversies? Let me know in the comments!

Summoner Wars!

Hey everybody!
It’s game day once again at spalanz.com, and it’s time to look at one of my favourite card games that hasn’t seen the light of day in a while – it’s Summoner Wars!

Summoner Wars

This game is one of those deceptively simple battle games with some really nice mechanics that you either love or hate. Basically, it’s a game between two people (multiplayer rules are available, but it just feels better with two) where you’re trying to eliminate your opponent’s Summoner, not merely wipe him out or anything. Because you’re only going after one card, it’s a really strategic game, as you try to block your opponent while at the same time go after his Summoner. It also has a really interesting resource mechanic that, as I say, you either love or hate. Let’s take a look!

You start the game with a deck of cards that represent your faction, headed up by your Summoner. Plaid Had Games sells a variety of products for the game, and each faction deck available comes with a unique Summoner and a Reference Card, along with the rest of the cards. This Reference Card shows you where to place your starting units in relation to your side of the battlefield board. In addition to units, you also have Wall cards that you play to both help block your opponent’s progress, and which also serve as summoning points for your guys. 

Summoner Wars

To begin, then, you’ll have a fairly generic setup, with your Summoner hiding out at the bottom of your board. Over the course of the game, you summon more units into play to help defend and overrun, but if you can’t pay their cost, or if you don’t have any available walls in play to summon adjacent to, you can’t summon those cards.

What’s this about summoning costs, I hear you ask?

In addition to Summoners, there are two other types of unit cards: Commons and Champions. They’re what you’d expect, chump units and more beefy units, respectively. Each card has an attack value in the circle on the top left and, under this, its Summon cost and what type of damage it deals, either ranged or combat (bow and sword, respectively). Each unit also has a health rating, and finally, some kind of special effect that it can do in the game.

Each player has a draw deck, a discard pile, and a Magic pile in their play area, and it is cards from this Magic pile that pay for the Summon cost. At the end of your turn, you get to “build magic” by discarding cards face down into your Magic pile. This is a good way of thinning out your hand if you drew massively expensive units in your opening hand, for instance. To pay for each point in a unit’s Summon cost, you discard face down a card from your Magic pile, so you really need to take account of what you use to build a deck (more shortly).

You can discard any number of cards from your hand when you build magic, but something I find really cool is that defeated enemy units go into your Magic pile – you use the bodies of your vanquished enemies to put build your own army on the board! Muwahahahahaha!

Ahem.

So how do you vanquish said enemies? Well, combat is obviously the main thrust of this game, as you try to hack and slash your way to your opponent’s Summoner.

Summoner Wars

Combat is pretty simple, and uses d6 to determine the outcomes. In the above picture, the Tundra Orcs’ Thwarter has an attack rating of 1, and deals Combat damage rather than Ranged damage, so needs to be orthogonally adjacent to the enemy. He rolls 1 d6, and if the result is 3 or greater, the attack hits. The 9-pip grid underneath the card’s name shows its health rating: the Zombie Warrior has a health of 2 so, while the 4 rolled is enough to wound the warrior, it won’t kill him this time.

I really enjoy this game, the level of strategy in particular is something that appeals to me as I get older! However, it’s also a game that I haven’t really gotten to play all that much – in fact, it’s getting on for four years since I last played it with an actual person! That’s pretty surprising to me. While each faction deck is playable right out of the box, Plaid Hat Games sells a bunch of decks to allow you to mix things up, specifically the Reinforcements and now, Second Summoners. These all add options that allow you to create custom decks to suit your own playstyle. There are also Mercenary cards that have been floating around the game for a while, though they are also a distinct Faction that you can play in the game, with their own Summoner. Each deck will be built around a Summoner, whose Reference Card, in addition to having the start-up formation, has a list of the event cards associated with him or her. You then have pretty much free rein to build a deck with no more than three Champions and 18 Commons.

The most recent product for the game is Summoner Wars: Alliances, which I haven’t bought but sounds great, as the original sixteen factions in the game have teamed up to form eight allied factions. Sounds pretty cool, anyway!

Summoner Wars

My games recently have been with the excellent app that is available for iOS and Android, and provides a really good play experience all from the comfort of your daily commute, or whatever! The main app is free, though it allows for in-app purchases of different factions and stuff, but you really get the gist of things without having to pay for all the add-ons. Definitely worth a look if you haven’t downloaded it already!

Hobby Progress, week 22

Well folks, week 22 has crept up on me, and due to a number of factors, I haven’t actually managed to do a lot this week! We’ve had some pretty great weather here in the UK, which is always cause to drop whatever you’re doing and enjoy it, because it won’t last! But some things have been done, so let’s take a look!

Hobby Progress 22

First of all, I’ve base coated two Deathwing Knights in Zandri dust. Not exactly cause for celebration, and I’m not exactly positive for these right now, given how long it took me to paint the regular Terminators, but I saw a post on instagram that inspired me to start work on these guys. I built up a five-man squad, along with Belial to lead them, back on Christmas Eve, and after the excitement of priming them, I’ve done nothing with them! Long time readers won’t be surprised by this, however. At any rate, I’m going to just plod along with these for the next few weeks, and see where I get with them. I enjoyed the Terminators, so hopefully I can say the same about these soon!

Hobby Progress 22

The main event, however, has been work on my Orruk brutes. I have got to say right now, I love these models, they are absolutely wonderful to work with! Of course, the arms lead to some fairly standard poses, and I don’t think I’d like to go with more than ten of them, at most, but they do look great. Like the Ogres of days gone past, but with much better detailing and stuff.

I’ve been reading a Pathfinder novel for what feels like an interminable amount of time now (don’t be fooled, it’s actually really good – I’ll be doing a blog when I’m done, so stay tuned for that!) that mentioned a blood-red demon, and it really inspired me to paint something that way. After a conversation at my local store about how I dislike painting red, though disliked white more, I decided to kinda challenge myself to painting these guys with red skin.

I have to say, I’m really quite pleased with the result. It’s a basecoat of Mephiston Red, shaded with Carroburg Crimson, and then lightly drybrushed with Astorath Red. I think my drybrushing technique has been akin to my general painting technique up to now, of just wanting to get the colour on the damn miniature as quickly as possible! So I really went for a lighter application, almost dusting it across the skin area, then a further dusting on the particularly raised parts, then a third dusting on the parts that the light would naturally hit. Finally, I made sure the faces were sufficiently highlighted, and voila!

It’s difficult to see on the guy with the gore-choppa as the weapon covers most of his body, but the skin has a bit of a smoky-red appearance, perhaps enhanced by the black of the surrounding bits at the moment. This will likely subdue once the armour is done, as I’m painting mine as Stoneskulls so have that cream look, though with the odd Khorne red plate to mix things up. How that will work with the skin being red will remain to be seen, though the Khorne red is more of a burgundy kinda shade, so should hopefully stand out enough!

At any rate, that’s pretty much it for this week. I did actually start painting last week’s Necropolis Knights, though made the mistake of trying the Corax White primer first. They’re chalky/grainy and, while it was only a light primer before I switched to Chaos Black, I feel that they might be ruined, which is annoying as hell due to their scarcity now!

Enough of that, however – I’m going to concentrate on these Orruks, sprinkling in the Deathwing Knights, so hopefully there will be more exciting progress next week!

Game stuff! (Mostly Lord of the Rings…)

Hey everybody!
It’s a pretty decent Saturday today, with some interesting things on the horizon to talk about, so let’s get right to it!

Runebound expansions

First of all, Fantasy Flight have announced a further two expansions for the third edition Runebound, also due in the third quarter like those previously announced. Like the previously-announced expansions, we’re getting a pairing of scenario pack and adventure pack, one that gives us a whole new thing to do, and one that just gives more cards to add to the existing stuff. Taken as a foursome, these expansions feel like a single big box expansion should feel, with new scenarios, new heroes, and new stuff that can just be added to the base game for more of the same. By splitting it up, some fans might feel they’re being overcharged, but I like the idea of being able to buy just what you want, something that appeals to me as I try to curb my spending on games somewhat (heresy, I know!)

We’ve also got new expansions for Imperial Assault and Eldritch Horror released this past week, which both look pretty exciting!

Munitorum Armoured Containers

Games Workshop are releasing containers for Warhammer 40k next weekend, and I’m both underwhelmed and intrigued at the same time! They look like possibly the least-exciting kit ever for a tactical miniatures wargame, yet I have such a soft spot for things like this that I can’t help but be intrigued! We’re also getting the Adeptus Mechanicus Enginseer that was released exclusively with a tank a few months back, and the plastic Broodlord that came with the Shield of Baal boxset in 2014. I managed to pick up one of the latter (as well as buying the boxset) so I’m not particularly fussed on those releases…

I did pop into my local GW today, and picked up two of the new Citadel paints – Waystone Green and Skullcrusher Brass. They’ve released four new metallic layer paints that look very much like replacements for current metallics, but with a better coverage or something. I’m not particularly convinced, but I bought the brass to try it out. The snow texture paint Mourn Mountain Snow has disappeared from my local store, which has prompted me to re-evaluate my Necron army. All of those metallic guys have been based in snow, but as they were some of the first models I painted, I’ve noticed that I try to match the earlier, crappier paint jobs whenever I add to the force. However, I’m thinking I may start a smaller force with a completely different look, predominantly with brass rather than silver armour. Stay tuned for that, anyway!

In addition to the metallics, GW have released three technical paints that essentially allow you to paint better gemstones. I find this an interesting prospect, so bought one pot to see what it’s like. I’m actually planning to try it on the second Necron force’s weaponry, which might be exciting!

Returning to Fantasy Flight but staying with Necrons, I managed to get my first game of Conquest with the new faction yesterday, playing against the game store guy’s Tyranid deck. I played him a few weeks back when he’d just built this one, and managed to get my first victory in Conquest for what feels like ever, but didn’t manage quite so well this time around!

The deck used Anrakyr the Traveler as warlord, and I wanted to try out a large number of the Necron cards so only went for ten enslaved allies, focusing on cheap mooks who would do something other than just act as a meat shield. It actually went really well for a while, but my warlord was bloodied and, in the final climactic battle, died instantly to an Ymgarl Genestealer due to its +2 combat rating while the Tyranid warlord was at the same planet – yikes!

It was a really great game though, and I really enjoyed both the challenge of getting the deck built with so many out-of-faction cards, and seeing card versions of the metal warriors that I feel so attached to, having painted up nearly 2000 points of them!

Finally, and sticking with LCGs, I wanted to talk about Lord of the Rings.

It’s a card game that is so very close to my heart, though one that I haven’t played in a very long time, despite continuing to collect the expansions for it. I’ve often called it my favourite game of all time, yet I actually haven’t opened the latest adventure pack, despite having bought it two or three weeks ago. It made me wonder whether the magic has gone now that the game has become so bloated: I haven’t looked at changing my decks for a long time, I haven’t played any of the new quests from Ringmaker or Angmar Awakened, and my attempt to run through the Saga expansions didn’t get further than the very first quest!

I had a game with Hunt for Gollum a month ago, and felt distinctly dispirited by the way that game panned out, so disassembled my deck and put everything away, and that was pretty much that. However, not to be beaten, I have today made it through three quests, and I think there may actually be a return of the original magic…

 

I played three of the early quests, using my elf deck headed up by Elrond, Legolas, and spirit Glorfindel. First off, I tried my luck with Passage through Mirkwood, which is a quest I think a lot of people ignore, or use merely to test their decks with, but is one I enjoy for its classic feel. I managed to win fairly easily, though those Dol Guldur Orcs did manage to deal a lot of damage to Elrond as my primary quester!

I then tried my hand at The Dead Marshes, another underrated quest in my view! I like this one because of the Escape test mechanic that forces you to quest slowly to ensure you have the willpower to pass the test after the quest phase. However, I managed to draw into the combo I needed really quickly, which put Light of Valinor on Glorfindel, allowing him to quest without raising threat and provide a chunk of willpower to the Escape test, and Arod was on Legolas to ensure the maximum progress could be placed! I also managed to use Elf Stone to bring out Haldir for free, which was great! It was over pretty quickly, with only one resource token on Gollum meaning the final Escape test wasn’t all that climactic!

Finally, I went for The Redhorn Gate. This is one of those quests that I love, yet find so brutal at times that I just want to cry in a corner. Some early bad luck kept discarding my resources, which meant I couldn’t get any momentum at first, but again had a first-turn Light of Valinor on Glorfindel so that I could keep him questing and attacking. I also managed to get Vilya on Elrond, though that card is predominantly in the deck for flavour as I was using him as my prime questing hero. Being able to quest for 10 was a real boon with Caradhras in the staging area until stage 3B, of course, and still having at least six attack power could deal with most threats while a series of cheap allies chump blocked them.

It was really nice to get back into this game, and I sincerely hope that I can start playing it more often in the coming weeks and months. Especially since I’ve finally started to mix up my decks!

I’ve had four decks built up for at least two years now, and haven’t touched them at all. Getting rid of one after Hunt for Gollum last month left me with my dwarfs, my elves, and my Rohan/eagles decks. I’ve swapped out a couple of cards from the elves one now, as there have been quite a few good cards to come out of the last cycle and couple of deluxe expansions, and the dwarf deck has had a very minor tweak. The biggest change, for me, is that I’ve gotten rid of the eagles from my Rohan deck, making it straight Rohan. In all honesty, I wasn’t quite sure what I was doing after stripping all o the eagles out – there are a lot less pure Rohan cards than I was expecting, so I’ve gone for a few Valour events to see what I’ve been missing as a bit of a filler. I may find myself putting the eagles back soon, however, or else swapping Théoden (from tactics to spirit) so that the weight falls into spirit rather than tactics, I guess we’ll see!

Looking through all of the cards again, however, has gotten me really excited to try building new decks, one of which I’m keen to build is another all-purpose fellowship kind of deck, which may indeed kickstart my efforts to play the Saga expansions once again!

Let’s hope this comes to pass, anyway!