Modelling Chaos

Evening everyone!

I’m taking a break from keeping up with the GenCon news – or more accurately, I’m trying to recover after yesterday’s excitement!!! – to talk about some of my latest experiences with modelling.

As you hopefully know by now, I’m looking forward with increasing enthusiasm to the upcoming Shadows of Brimstone, which, it was announced a short while ago, will feature substantial assembly of the miniatures. To help me with this, I bought a Warhammer miniature as a “practice” piece, and last weekend I fell head over heels into the hobby of miniature modelling and painting. I have, this past week, spent a couple of hundred pounds on getting seriously into this hobby, with a whole slew of paints as well as the associated utensils to really give it a proper go.

Last weekend, I had a lot of help in assembling the miniature from the manager of the Games Workshop store in Chester, and the second miniature I painted was one of the pre-assembled Battlelore miniatures. Today, however, I was on my own. I have made up two miniatures today, a Fiend of Slaanesh, and a Daemon Prince!

As I said, the whole point of this was initially to help me prepare for all the work involved when Shadows of Brimstone hits, so I want to share my experiences of modelling and painting with the wider public, in case it helps others in a similar position to myself.

Fiend of Slaanesh – modelling
Slaanesh is my favourite of the four Ruinous Powers of Chaos in the Warhammer universe. The Prince of Pleasure, everything is so delightfully lilac and pink, and could almost be quite pleasant when compared with the pestilence of Nurgle or the bloodthirst of Khorne. However, Slaanesh is pretty depraved, and his followers have all sorts of demented mutations made to them in pursuit of pleasure through pain. The Fiend of Slaanesh is a pretty weird model, almost a docile pony-like creature, but with six limbs, two of which end in crab-like pincers, and a very weird head indeed!

Fiend of Slaanesh

Fiend of Slaanesh
All the bits

The Fiend of Slaanesh is a resin Fine Cast model, softer than plastic and with a higher degree of detail. Unfortunately, the sprues also have a lot of gunk from the casting process, and a lot of clean-up work was required once they were cut off…

Fiend of Slaanesh
All the body parts grouped together for ease of assembly

Unfortunately, I do not have the steadiest of hands, and have never really done anything like this before, but even I was shocked at just how quickly it was before I stabbed myself with the craft knife!

Fiend of Slaanesh
Aaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!

Moving on! Resin Fine Cast models must be assembled with Super Glue – the Plastic Glue (sometimes called Plastic Cement) won’t work, because of the bonding process. The various components all fit together in one way, and have bumps and grooves on them, which helps a lot with assembly, but it’s always best to dry-assemble the model first to check the way bits go before going ahead and gluing them together.

Fiend of Slaanesh
Halfway through assembly

The finished beast is quite nice, I must admit! While super glue bonds pieces really quickly, I’m leaving this chap overnight to make sure he is fully secure before moving on to painting. Make sure to check back tomorrow for part two of this exciting series!

Fiend of Slaanesh Fiend of Slaanesh

Daemon Prince – modelling
The Daemon Prince was the first “serious” model that I bought. The Beast of Nurgle and the Fiend of Slaanesh are both Fine Cast, small models that have a small handful of pieces, and are fairly straightforward to assemble. The Daemon Prince, however, was a whole other matter.

Daemon Prince
box contents

While these sprues look a bit intimidating at first glance, there is a handy instruction guide included, and the basic components are fairly easy to figure out. What I really like about Games Workshop here is the amount of choice they give us – there are components in this box to make a Warhammer Fantasy Daemon Prince, or a Warhammer 40k Daemon Prince! I eventually settled for a sort of mixture of the two, but I was really impressed by that – in fact, it proved to be the hardest part of the assembly, choosing which weapons I would use!

Daemon Prince

The basic assembly is actually really straightforward. The torso has a front and a back, which fit together quite snugly. The feet fit into a slot on the legs; all four of the limbs only fit onto the torso one way, and the tail fits over the bum to add further security to the join. The wings fit into recesses on the back, and the head sits snugly on the neck. Voila! There are all sorts of other bits like shoulder pads and a combat skirt, though I decided to only fit the latter. I used a thin Plastic Glue here – unlike super glue, Plastic Glue takes a while longer to dry, but that extra time does mean you have some “wiggle room” to ensure the pieces fit together in precisely the way you want. Plastic Glue works by effectively melting the plastic pieces together, and once fully dry creates a virtually unbreakable bond. It’s for this reason that you can’t use it on the resin models – resin is softer than plastic, and would effectively just dissolve.

The Daemon Prince was a bit fiddly to assemble, so I couldn’t photograph it step-by-step as I was concerned with it falling apart before the glue was set! However, I’m pretty sure you’ll agree, the finished product is pretty striking!

Daemon Prince Daemon Prince

(For the observant among you, yes, I have changed his head! I hadn’t realised there was a choice of three heads for this chap!)

Tomorrow, once the glue has properly set and whatnot, I’m going to set to painting them. The Fiend of Slaanesh has a fairly standard lilac colour scheme I want to go for, but I’m not 100% sure on the Daemon Prince yet. I’m going to have a think about it overnight, anyway. There are some really awesome paint jobs, looking around online, so I’m thinking I might try for something vaguely unique for my own! We shall see, anyway.

Until tomorrow, then!